1. Leaving Microsoft HQ

    I was hired at Microsoft on Dec 07, 1998 as a Technology Specialist for developer tools in the Dallas, Texas office. It was very exciting because I always wanted to work at Microsoft and knew that the smartest people in the industry worked there. I was amazed at what we were doing at the time and loved talking to people about our technology.

    A few months after that I went to the PDC and saw our vision for .NET. I thought to myself, “this is going to be a radical success or a glorious failure”, either way I wanted to be a part of it, so I packed up the family and moved to corporate to be one of the first .NET evangelists. I have been fortunate and just damn lucky to be a part of some pretty incredible things (e.g. HTML5, MIX Online, MIX, ASP.NET, .NET, etc.). I have also had the opportunity to meet some amazing, human, wicked-smart people that I will always appreciate getting to work with/know them.

    Without further ado: My last day at Microsoft HQ is November 1st.

    What’s next? Me and my family are moving to Vancouver, Canada!

    Canadian Flag

    So the first question you may have is, why are you going to Canada? Well, if you know me then you know that we go up there 4-5x a year on mini-vacations. We caught the “wouldn’t it be great to actually live here?” bug that many folks get. Having been a military kid growing up, I am used to moving around so staying somewhere for 10 years is definitely an anomaly. Also, the Tenderoni and I always talked about moving there and a rare thing happened that a role I wanted became available. So when an opportunity presented itself, we grabbed it! 

    Whoa! Are you leaving Microsoft? Sorry suckers, NO! I am going to be bringing it with HTML5 & CSS3 and other Microsoft greatness as a Developer & Designer evangelist working out of Vancouver for Microsoft!

    I am totally stoked that I will be able to work for Microsoft, doing what I love in a country that we always talked about moving to. I will still be talking about and pontificating on the things you have seen on this blog (including pet pictures!), but will probably add a little Canadian flair. 

    You can follow my adventures on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tommylee. If you are Canadian, please say hi!

  2. FRONTEND 2011 Conference Talks

    Front End 2011 Conference

    I absolutely enjoyed coming to Norway (even being sick) to talk to folks at the Front End Conference about Layout, CSS3 and <canvas>! Here are the links to my talks:

    Layout in the Time of CSS3

    Introduction to Drawing with HTML5’s <canvas>

    Thank you very much for everyone who came out to see this along with your kind words.

  3. Simply, thank you.

    Simply, thank you.

  4. When I hear someone mention “real” designers or “real” developers, I am not surprised they (1) always think they themselves are “real” and (2) their horse is rather high.

    — Quote Source: Me.

  5. Welcome to the Next Generation of Web Design

    Thanks to everyone that came out to my talk about The Next Generation of Web Design at Tech-Ed New Zealand. As promised, here is the deck, demos and links:

  6. Responsive Web Design:

    Thanks to everyone that came out to my talk about Responsive Web Design at Tech-Ed New Zealand. As promised, here is the deck, demos and links:

  7. Between the beautiful illustration, simplicity, CSS3 shout-out and the responsive design, it is no wonder I absolutely love this site. Hey guys, I am coming to Auckland, New Zealand on Wednesday, any chance to meet? 

    Between the beautiful illustration, simplicity, CSS3 shout-out and the responsive design, it is no wonder I absolutely love this site. Hey guys, I am coming to Auckland, New Zealand on Wednesday, any chance to meet? 

  8. Just because I believe the Internet needs one more cat picture. 

    Just because I believe the Internet needs one more cat picture. 

  9. 5 Rules for a Creative Culture By Ben Chestnut

    1. Avoid rules. Avoid order. Don’t just embrace chaos, but create a little bit of it. Constant change, from the top-down, keeps people nimble and flexible (and shows that you want constant change).

    2. Give yourself and your team permission to be creative. Permission to try something new, permission to fail, permission to embarrass yourself, permission to have crazy ideas.

    3. Hire weird people. Not just the tattoo’d and pierced-in-strange-places kind, but people from outside your industry who would approach problems in different ways than you and your normal competitors.

    4. Meetings are a necessary evil, but you can avoid the conference room and meet people in the halls, the water cooler, or their desks. Make meetings less about delegation and task management and more about cross-pollination of ideas (especially the weird ideas). This is a lot harder than centralized, top-down meetings. But this is your job — deal with it.

    5. Structure your company to be flexible. Creativity is often spontaneous, so the whole company needs to be able to pivot quickly and execute on them (see #1).

    — This quote comes from a Fast Company article on how MailChimp’s creative culture works. I don’t doubt it’s impact on their success. Every designer I know is keenly aware of them and what do they do? They make the mundane of e-mail newsletters actually fun.

  10. HTML5 Canvas at DevCon5

    DevCon5

    I truly appreciated everyone coming out to see my presentation (standing room only!) on HTML5 Canvas at DevCon5. Everyone was wicked smart, friendly and humored me by laughing at my rather unusual metaphors (e.g. a rabbit punching a mushroom).

    Like I mentioned, I wanted to provide everyone a link to my presentation, demos, and links to all the sites that I spoke about. Here they are:

    Thanks again to the great folks at DevCon5 for having me (based on your feedback they have invited me to speak at their other events!) and I hope you will let me know when you have built a spectacular Canvas-based app!

    You can follow me on Twitter to keep up to date on all kinds of HTML5 goodness.